Mountainfilm

2019 Moving Mountains Symposium

Date: May 24, 2019
Start Time: 9:00 a.m.
with Q&A

Equity. You could call it a buzzword, but that would be a vast oversimplification of a concept that’s nuanced, thorny and growing more crucial by the day.

Equity represents a new infrastructure for understanding our world — from boardrooms to universities, prisons to parks, classrooms all the way to the halls of politics. An awakening about the complex way we digest and classify narratives. And, in today’s charged climate, a key element for finding solutions to many systemic problems we are facing as a global society — from the gender pay gap to voting rights, race relations, accessibility to a quality education, healthcare and even nature.

Mountainfilm is excited to do a deep dive into the issue of equity during its 2019 Moving Mountains Symposium. To do so, we have invited some of the country’s top authors, scholars, activists and experts on this critical topic, and look forward to an illuminating, fascinating and at times challenging conversation.

The symposium will address the topic in both broad strokes and granular detail. Speakers will touch on equity and inclusion in the outdoors, talk about the tools we need to engage more constructively and discuss exciting work in the realms of workers’ rights and prison reform. Moderator Dr. Michael Sawyer, an assistant professor in the race, ethnicity and migration studies program at Colorado College, will shepherd the conversation and give it context. Panel discussions and Q&As will offer the opportunity to go into depth.

And rather than purporting to offer solutions, Mountainfilm will approach the symposium from a place of humility, openness and learning. Because at its essence, honoring equity is about being willing to value the power of every story, without privileging one.

Robin DiAngelo: White Fragility

Symposium

Robin DiAngelo grew up poor and white, and has built her life’s work around examining the way race shapes society. After coining the term “white fragility” in an article, she went on to pen a best-selling book of the same name with a subheading Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Race. DiAngelo will present on the socialization that inculcates white fragility, the ways it has historically reinstated white equilibrium and skills needed so that white people can engage more constructively across race.

In Person:
  • Robin DiAngelo
  • Carolyn Finney: Equity in the Outdoors

    Symposium

    Writer, performer, professor and cultural geographer Carolyn Finney has been a leading voice in the conversation that’s addressing the lack of diversity in the outdoors. The author of Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors will discuss strategies for developing greater cultural competency in the outdoor realm and engaging in relations of reciprocity with diverse communities.

    In Person:
  • Carolyn Finney
  • Bam Mendiola: Modeling Accountability

    Symposium

    As the non-binary child of Mexican migrant workers growing up in rural Washington State, Bam Mendiola’s childhood was storied. Later, they found their strength in climbing the volcanic peaks of the Pacific Northwest. Today, the outdoor advocate and diversity consultant’s work, which is informed by their social location as a queer person of color, has been featured by NBC, REI and the Race and Pedagogy National Conference. Mendiola will address equity, modeling accountability and the power of ancestral survivance.

    In Person:
  • Bam Mendiola
  • John Pavlovitz: Stuff that Needs to Be Said

    Symposium

    In his blog Stuff That Needs To Be Said, writer, pastor and activist John Pavlovitz offers raw analysis of social and political events as observed through a faith-based lens. By breaking from the molds of traditional left or right viewpoints, Pavlovitz brings a fresh perspective that is largely based on hope, inclusion and positivity. The pastor, who is committed to equality, diversity and justice both inside and outside of faith-based communities, will talk about how to fix the country’s empathy problem.

    In Person:
  • John Pavlovitz
  • Catherine Flowers: Civil Rights and Environmental Justice

    Symposium

    Catherine Flowers made a name for herself by shining a spotlight on a lack of sewage infrastructure for poor residents in Lowndes County, Alabama, earning the nickname “the Erin Brockovich of Sewage.” Today, she advocates for sanitation and environmental issues through the organization she founded, the Alabama Center for Rural Community Development Corporation. She’ll talk about the crucial task of bringing civil rights to the realm of environmental justice.

    In Person:
  • Catherine Flowers
  • Saru Jayaraman: Fighting for Fair Wages

    Symposium

    For food industry workers, fair wages aren’t always easy to come by. Saru Jayaraman is working to change that. Her creation of the Food Labor Research Center at UC Berkeley is the first of its kind to merge both food and labor issues in an academic setting. Her work has been chronicled in the book The Accidental American, and she has become a leading voice fighting for equity in the food industry. She will unpack the topic of wage equity in the kitchen.

    In Person:
  • Saru Jayaraman
  • Baz Dreisinger: Innovative Incarceration Reform

    Symposium

    In the United States, mass incarceration is synonymous with criminal justice, and imprisonment rates come with shocking racial disparities. Baz Dreisinger, a Fulbright Scholar, professor and author of Incarceration Nations: A Journey to Justice in Prisons Around the World, travels the globe examining the issue and searching for ways to help fix the system, such as increasing access to higher education for incarcerated individuals. Dreisinger, who serves as executive director of the global think tank Incarceration Nations Network (INN), will talk about innovative incarceration reform.

    In Person:
  • Baz Dreisinger