Our Festival Guests

The following guests are speakers at the Symposium, judges for the Moving Mountains Prize, guest presenters, filmmakers, film subjects, panel participants in a Town Talk or luminaries of other varieties. For the specific festival involvement of any given guest, please click on their name to expand their profile.

This list includes a sampling of Mountainfilm in Telluride's guests for 2014, but it's far from a comprehensive look at all those who will participate in the festival. We'll update these pages with new guests and new information regularly, so please check back often.

Annie Agnone

Annie Agnone

Annie Agnone is a writer, photographer and educator. Her passion for learning about different cultures and telling stories led her to convert her car into a camper and drive over 20,000 miles through 36 states at night to explore and document nocturnal culture in the U.S. Annie holds bachelor's degrees in visual communication and psychology from Ohio University and an MFA in Creative Writing from The University of Alabama. She works as a program director for Putney Student Travel, where she designs and leads educational travel programs for high school students.

Azzam Alwash

Azzam Alwash

Born in Iraq, Azzam Alwash spent his childhood days exploring the Mesopotamian marshlands in the southern part of his homeland — known to many as the birthplace of civilization. When Saddam Hussein rose to power, Alwash moved to the United States, but when the regime fell, he returned home because the marshlands he loved had been destroyed by Hussein’s regime. In 2004, Alwash founded the nonprofit Nature Iraq and put his experience in hydraulic engineering to use, surveying the region and developing a master plan to restore the marshes. He was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2013for his politically challenging restoration work.

Conrad Anker

Conrad Anker

With first ascents and routes on walls that span from Antarctica to Patagonia and Alaska to the Himalayas, author and North Face athlete Conrad Anker is a modern climbing legend. His long list of ascents includes the west face of Latok II in Pakistan’s Karakoram, the three towers of the Cerro Toree Massif in Patagonia and the “Streaked Wall” in Zion. Anker was part of the expedition that discovered the body of George Mallory on Mt. Everest in 1999. In October of 2011, along with Jimmy Chin and Renan Ozturk, Anker realized a long-held dream when he topped out on the Shark’s Fin on Meru in the Himalaya. He lives in Bozeman, Montana, where he sits on the board of the Conservation Alliance, the Rowell Fund for Tibet and the Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation.

Debra Bloomfield

Debra Bloomfield has photographed the American landscape for over 30 years. Primarily in color and often in large scale, her photographs are born from an intense emotional response to location and memory. Her work is included in the collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Berkeley Art Museum and The Victoria and Albert Museum in London. She received the 1991/92 San Francisco Foundation's James D. Phelan Art Award in Photography for her "Trotsky Series" and the 2005 Western Heritage Literary Award in Photography for her monograph "Four Corners." Bloomfield’s book Wilderness, is a collaboration of her photographs and the essays of environmental writer Terry Tempest Williams. Wilderness also features a CD, created with Bloomfield’s son, Jake Bloomfield Misrach. The audio is a collection of sounds that echo the images. Bloomfield teaches photography at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Douglas Brinkley

Douglas Brinkley

Douglas Brinkley is a professor of history at Rice University, a fellow at the James Baker III Institute of Public Policy and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, Los Angeles Book Review and American Heritage. Dubbed “America’s new past master” by the Chicago Tribune, Brinkley has written books on a variety of subjects – including wilderness. Brinkley’s title The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America was a New York Times best seller and also the recipient of the 2009 National Outdoor Book Award. Published in 2011, The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom was a second book focused on the preservation of wilderness. That same year, Brinkley testified before Congress about drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Brinkley also edited Jack Kerouac's diaries, Hunter S. Thompson's letters and Theodore Dreiser's travelogue.

Carter Brooks

Carter Brooks

The same year that Carter Brooks’ daughter was born, 2000, a scientific report forecasted that the polar ice cap would disappear by the time she would reach her grandmother’s age. While environmentalists began to fret about the future, Brooks found himself compelled instead by the urgency of witnessing and discovering meaning in this profound event. The artist, entrepreneur and self-proclaimed climate geek has since put together a series of art installations using ice — the obvious medium for a climate artist.

Wade Davis

Wade Davis

Named by the National Geographic Society as one of the Explorers for the Millenium, Wade Davis has been described as “a rare combination of scientist, scholar, poet and passionate defender of all of life’s diversity.” In recent years, his work has taken him to East Africa, Borneo, Nepal, Peru, Polynesia, Tibet, Mali, Benin, Togo, New Guinea, Colombia, Australia, Vanautu, Mongolia and the High Arctic of Nunuvut and Greenland. An ethnographer, photographer, writer and filmmaker, he holds degrees in ethnography and biology and received his Ph.D. in ethnobotany, all from Harvard University. He has authored a dozen books, including The Serpent and the Rainbow, One River, The Clouded Leopard, Light at the Edge of the World and The Lost Amazon. A native of Canada, Davis divides his time between Washington, D.C. and a remote fishing lodge in the Stikine Valley of northern British Columbia.

Tim DeChristopher

Tim DeChristopher

In 2008, Tim DeChristopher was an average college student studying economics at the University of Utah, but then he walked into a BLM auction and bid $1.8 million on drillings rights to pristine public lands near Utah’s iconic national parks for which he never intended to pay. That bold act of disobedience catapulted DeChristopher into the spotlight, where he was celebrated by many as a new leader of climate change activism. Over the next several years, DeChristopher inspired rallies, formed the organization Peaceful Uprising and rose in prominence as he railed against destruction of wild places. He was also prosecuted by the federal government and, ultimately, served two years in prison for making false bids on energy leases. DeChristopher, who is the subject of the documentary Bidder 70 (Mountainfilm 2012), attends Harvard Divinity School and continues to speak about climate change.

Jared Diamond

Jared Diamond

Jared Diamond is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author of five best-selling books, translated into 38 languages, about human societies and human evolution: Guns, Germs, and Steel; Collapse; Why Is Sex Fun?; The Third Chimpanzee and The World Until Yesterday. As a professor of geography at UCLA, he has also conducted research and taught in three other fields: the biology of New Guinea birds, digestive physiology and conservation biology. His prizes and honors include the U.S. National Medal of Science, the Pulitzer-prize for non-fiction, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Science and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is a director of World Wildlife Fund/U.S. and of Conservation International. As a biological explorer, his most widely publicized finding was his rediscovery, at the top of New Guinea’s remote Foja Mountains, of the long-lost Golden-fronted Bowerbird, previously known only from four specimens found in a Paris feather shop in 1895.

Dexter Filkins

Dexter Filkins

Since journalist Dexter Filkins joined The New Yorker in January of 2011, he has written about a bank heist in Afghanistan and the democratic protests in the Middle East. Before that, he made a name for himself with his extensive coverage of conflicts, particularly in the Middle East. Filkins won a Pulitzer Prize in 2009 as part of a team of New York Times reporters in Pakistan and Afghanistan and was a Pulitzer finalist in 2002 for his dispatches from Afghanistan. Filkins, who was a Neiman Fellow at Harvard University, has also worked for the Miami Herald and the Los Angeles Times. His 2008 book, The Forever War, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best Nonfiction Book and was named a best book of the year by The New York Times, Washington Post, Time and Boston Globe.

Porter Fox

Porter Fox

In 2012, a couple of skiers from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, noticed that snow was disappearing from the western U.S. and wondered how long it would be before it affected the mountains in their backyard. They called Porter Fox, a lifelong skier, former Jackson Hole News reporter and current Powder magazine editor, to inquire if he was interested in writing a book about climate change and snow. DEEP: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow was published a year and a half later. The book paints a picture of the rich culture of skiing, the miracle of snow and how both are in jeopardy if humans don’t stem climate change. While the book is filled with alarming data — Rocky Mountain spring snowpack is down by 20 percent and Europe has lost half of its glacial ice, for example — it offers solutions to curb the climate crisis. Fox, who is based in New York City, edits the literary travel writing journal Nowhere, and his work has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Outside, Men’s Journal and National Geographic Adventure.

Eugenie Frerichs

Eugenie Frerichs

Based in Portland, Oregon, Eugénie Frerichs is a writer and photographer whose current project, “The Wilderness State,” explores the many varied interpretations of wilderness in North America today. Part writing, part photography, with a touch of performance peppered in, the work is an on-going assessment of the wild: how we define it, how we experience it (in both urban and rural settings), where technology fits in and what of its future.

For Mountainfilm in Telluride, Eugénie will present three facets of the project: “The Gospel According to John Muir” (street performance), “Field Study” (a street installation for data collection) and “Men and Trees” (an on-going photographic study).

Devlin Gandy

Devlin Gandy

Devlin Gandy was born and raised in the Santa Monica Mountains, just north of Los Angeles. Growing up in the mountains left an indelible mark upon his perspective, creativity, interests and relationship to nature; it was also where he first learned about rock art. He is currently a student at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is pursuing an anthropology degree and spends his weekends in the wilds of California in search of reminders of the past. For his Young Explorers Grant project, he photographed Chumash rock art in stunning and hard-to-reach corners of California.

Adam Harris

Adam Harris

Wildlife advocate Adam Duncan Harris earned his Ph.D. in art history at the University of Minnesota and soon after became the curator of art and research at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He is the author of Wildlife in American Art: Masterworks from the National Museum of Wildlife Art and editor of the award-winning book Bob Kuhn: Drawing on Instinct.

Alex Honnold

Alex Honnold

In a matter of just a couple of years, Alex Honnold has risen from relative obscurity as a dirtbag climber roaming Yosemite Valley to one of the most widely recognized professional climbers in the world. His hook: audacious free solo ascents of some of America’s biggest walls with a mix of tremendous strength, steely focus and incredible mental control. Honnold has climbed everything from Moonlight Buttress to Half Dome and the Yosemite Triple without a rope, but he’s known as much for his humbleness and no-big-deal attitude as his huge achievements. He has been profiled by “60 Minutes,”  featured on the cover of National Geographic and is the subject of the films Honnold 3.0 (Mountainfilm 2013) and Alone on the Wall (Mountainfilm 2010).

Jeffrey Kerby

Jeffrey Kerby

Jeffrey Kerby is a photographer and Ph.D. student at Penn State's Polar Center. His photos and scientific research in Ethiopia, Mongolia and Greenland focus on species interactions and have been published in numerous academic journals, popular magazines and books. In 2011, he returned to the Ethiopian Highlands with National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee Vivek Venkataraman to explore the remarkable interactions between gelada monkeys and Ethiopian wolves on the remote Guassa Plateau.

Simon Kilmurry

Simon Kilmurry

The executive producer of the Public Broadcasting Service’s Point of View documentary film series (POV), television’s longest-running showcase for independent nonfiction film, Simon Kilmurry has an extensive background in media and documentary films. He also serves as the executive director of American Documentary, where he has helped set the strategic direction for the organization, securing pioneering partnerships with both Netflix and Docurama. Additionally, Kilmurry has served as a board member and treasurer for Elders Share the Arts and East Harlem Block Schools and as an informal advisor and funding panel member for other organizations, including the New York City Center for Arts Education, the Association for Independent Video and Filmmakers, and New York State Council on the Arts.

Gary Lang

Gary Lang

Gary Lang has exhibited his contemporary paintings and video art around the planet — from Japan to The Netherlands. He is known for enormous, circular paintings with bold colors that penetrate optical space.

Jenni Lowe-Anker

Jennifer Lowe-Anker

Jenni Lowe-Anker is an author, artist and adventurer. She was married to Alex Lowe, one of the world’s greatest mountaineers. After Lowe died in 1999 during a Himalayan expedition with his friend Conrad Anker, she and Anker married, and he adopted the Lowe’s three children. Lowe-Anker’s extraordinary story of love, loss and courage is told in her memoir, Forget Me Not.

Vance G. Martin

Vance Martin joined The Wild Foundation — the only international organization dedicated entirely to protecting wilderness and wild nature around the world — as president in 1984 after 15 years in international business and nonprofit management. An innovative leader known for bridging the interests of people and nature, he has lived extensively overseas, worked in over 45 countries and helped to establish many nonprofits. An acknowledged expert in international nature conservation and wilderness protection, he serves on the boards of numerous organizations, such as the Cheetah Conservation Fund, Friends of Peace Parks, Fulcrum Publishing, Wilderness Foundation (South Africa), Wilderness Foundation (UK), International Conservation Caucus Foundation and others. He is also the founder and current co-chairman of the IUCN Wilderness Specialist Group and has edited and authored many publications. He is a native of the U.S. Piedmont region and graduated magna cum laude from West Virginia University.

Juan Martinez

Juan Martinez

A national spokesman for the importance of getting youth into the outdoors, Juan Martinez works in South Central Los Angeles. As an advocate for underprivileged youth, he attends White House forums, advises the U.S. Department of the Interior on plans to create a youth conservation corps, serves as National Youth Volunteer Coordinator for the Sierra Club, and organizes youth delegations to attend conferences on green jobs and outdoor experiences. Above all, he focuses on inspiring and nurturing grassroots action in the 15- to 29-year-old millennial generation. Martinez spearheads the Natural Leaders Network of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that creates links between environmental organizations, corporations, government, education and individuals to reconnect children with nature.

Lauren Oakes

Lauren Oakes

A former river guide, Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University’s Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, Lauren Oakes enjoys combining adventure and wilderness experience with education. She studies the process of forest development in forests affected by yellow-cedar decline that is associated with climate change, doing field work in Alaska’s West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness in Tongass National Forest and Glacier Bay National Park.Oakes has contributed to the New York Times Green Blog, the San Francisco Chronicle and the book Wilderness, a photographic project by Debra Bloomfield. In 2008, she collaborated with Felt Soul Media to co-produce of Red Gold.

Klaus Pichler

Austrian-born Klaus Pichlerspent three years photographing the hidden parts of the Natural History Museum in Vienna for a series called "Skeletons in the Closet." A former landscape architect, the topics of his work are the hidden aspects of everyday life in its varying forms, as well as the secret codes and rules of different social groups. Pichler’s work has been exhibited in international photography festivals, such as Voies Off Arles, Delhi Photo Festival, Belfast Photo Festival, Circulations Festival Paris and Eyes-On Festival in Vienna. He lives and works in Vienna and has no education in photography whatsoever—and likes it that way.

Reza

Reza

Reza, who goes by a single name, is a prodigious photojournalist, committed humanitarian and National Geographic fellow who has been highly decorated for his achievements in the fields of journalism and humanitarian work. He has traveled the globe with a camera, capturing the Iranian Revolution, nomad horsemen of Eastern Turkestan, refugee camps of Rwanda and more. His iconic and arresting images have graced many National Geographic covers. But there is more to the man than simply photos: He founded Aina, an international nonprofit dedicated to the education and empowerment of women and children through media and communication; consulted with the UN in Afghanistan to distribute food to war-torn parts of the country; and won the Hope Prize for his contribution to a joint project with UNICEF, “Lost Children Project,” in Rwanda. He is the author of 16 books, and his photographs have been exhibited in cities around the world.

David Roberts

David Roberts

David Roberts is an accomplished mountaineer and the author of more than 20 books on mountaineering, adventure and the history of the American Southwest. His titles include Escape Routes, Moments of Doubt, Sandstone Spine, True Summit and The Last of His Kind, and his writing has appeared in National Geographic, National Geographic Adventure and The Atlantic Monthly. Roberts’ latest book is Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration.

Flair Robinson

Flair Robinson

Longtime Telluride resident Flair Robinson is a self-taught, mixed media, mosaic and assemblage artist. She works primarily with ceramic tile, hand-cut glass and recycled junk. First and foremost a colorist, she is fascinated by the endless possibilities of color combining and constantly plays with color variations, inspired by those found in early American folk art, vintage road signs, vintage ephemera and advertising from the 1940s and 1950s. Robinson’s studio is housed in the historic Stronghouse building in the heart of downtown Telluride.

Thom Ross

Thom Ross

The work of Thom Ross asks viewers to re-examine either what they know about history or what they think they know about history. Focusing on the historical “folk hero,” he has painted Indians playing croquet and ping pong, a camel walking through the deserts of Arizona with a human skeleton strapped to his back and General Custer standing next to his pet pelican. His paintings from a series on the ill-fated "last climb" of British climbers George Mallory and Andrew Irvine — two men who disappeared on the north ridge of Mt. Everest on June 8, 1924 — were inspired by his friendship with artist Jenni Lowe-Anker and her husband, mountaineer and climber Conrad Anker. A wholly self-taught artist, Ross shows in numerous galleries throughout the U.S. and lectures at colleges on the Wild West, where he combines a unique and passionate presentation of art and history.

David Rothenberg

David Rothenberg - Mountainfilm

A musician, composer, author and philosopher-naturalist, David Rothenberg’s work and many collaborations cross genres and species. He has written about animal sounds as music in his books: Why Birds Sing: A Journey into the Mystery of Birdsong and Thousand Mile Song: Whale Music in a Sea of Sound. His latest book, Bug Music, is about insects and music and is accompanied by a companion CD. Bug Music has garnered attention in The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and on PBS “News Hour” and NPR’s “Radiolab.” Rothenberg is also a composer and jazz clarinetist and has produced nine CDs under his own name.

M Sanjayan

M Sanjayan

M Sanjayan, executive vice president and senior scientist at Conservation International, specializes in human well-being and conservation, Africa, wildlife ecology and media outreach and public speaking on conservation issues. Sanjayan is currently filming his new TV series, "Earth – A New Wild," produced by National Geographic Television in association with the Academy Award-winning Passion Pictures. It will air on PBS in 2015. He is also the science correspondent for "Years of Living Dangerously," a ten-episode docu-series event on climate change airing this spring on Showtime. In January 2014, he returned as a featured contributor to the BBC World News series "The Power of Nature." Sanjayan holds a doctorate from the University of California, Santa Cruz and has a research faculty appointment with the Wildlife Program at the University of Montana. He frequently contributes to CBS News; his scientific work has been published in Science, Nature and Conservation Biology; and he co-edited the book Connectivity Conservation. He has co-hosted documentaries for the Discovery Channel (“Mysteries of the Shark Coast” and “Expedition Alaska”), BBC (“Wildlife in a War-Zone”) and was featured on National Geographic TV (“Earth Report 2009”). His four-part series on energy for Discovery Channel (“Powering the Future”) aired in July 2010. When not at work, Sanjayan can be found trekking in Africa or fly-fishing in western Montana.

Florian Schulz

Florian Schulz

Through his continuous effort to take breathtaking photographs, German-born Florian Schulz works to inspire individuals to take action to protect endangered ecosystems and wilderness areas. As part of a Freedom to Roam project, Schulz dedicated years of his life to documenting the drama and beauty of North America’s most critical wildlife corridor: Yellowstone to Yukon. His first book, Yellowstone to Yukon: Freedom to Roam, received the Independent Book Publisher Award and was singled out as the book “Most Likely to Save the Planet.” Schulz’s photography has also been displayed in the Smithsonian and the American Museum of Natural History.

Morgan Spurlock

Morgan Spurlock

Morgan Spurlock rose to fame for his willingness to subject his body to 30 days fueled by nothing but McDonalds' fast food in his 2004 documentary Super Size Me. The film won Best Directing honors at the Sundance Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award. Since then, the New York-based writer, director and producer has worked on many projects, including the FX television series “30 Days” and the documentaries Where in the World is Osama Bin Laden, What Would Jesus Buy? and This is Us, a behind-the-scenes look at the hit pop group One Direction.

Cheryl Strayed

Cheryl Strayed

At 22, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s death, her family scattered and her own marriage soon dissolved. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than 1,000 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State — and she would do it alone. Her #1 New York Times bestseller Wild chronicles the story of her impulsive and ultimately healing adventure. Wild was chosen by Oprah Winfrey as her first selection for Oprah's Book Club 2.0 and optioned for film by Reese Witherspoon's production company, Pacific Standard. Strayed is also author to New York Times bestseller Tiny Beautiful Things and the novel Torch, and her writing has appeared in The Best American Essays, the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post Magazine, Vogue, Allure, The Missouri Review, The Sun, The Rumpus — where she has written the popular "Dear Sugar" column since 2010 — and elsewhere. Her books have been translated into 28 languages. She holds an MFA in fiction writing from Syracuse University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota. She lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband and their two children.

Maggie Taylor

Maggie Taylor

After more than 10 years as a still life photographer, Maggie Taylor began using a computer to create images. She spent her childhood watching countless hours of situation comedies and science fiction on television, which ultimately had a large influence on her work, and her digital composites have been featured in one-person international exhibits at such museums as the George Eastman House; Harn Museum of Art at Univeristy of Florida; Museum of Fine Arts in Houston; The Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University; and the Museum of Photography in Seoul, Korea. Her work is featured in No Ordinary Days, Adobe Photoshop Master Class: Maggie Taylor’s Landscape of Dreams, Solutions Beginning with A and Modernbook Editions’ Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. Taylor lives amid the Spanish moss and live oaks at the edge of a small swamp on the outskirts of Gainesville, Florida.

Amber Valenti

Amber Valenti

Amber Valenti is a physician assistant with a background in rescue and remote medicine. She has been guiding and celebrating rivers around the world for over a decade. A wild woman with an insatiable thirst for undiscovered places, she thrives on the dusty cracks of foreign cities and swirling currents of untamed rivers. Along with Becca Dennis, Sabra Purdy and Krystle Wright, Valenti was part of the Young Explorers Grant-funded Nobody's River Expedition — a group comprised of four women with an affinity for silly antics and a love of falling off the map. In the summer of 2013, they undertook a documentary expedition on one of the world's greatest and least known free-flowing rivers, the Amur.  They traveled and documented sections of this last-of-its-kind river from the remote Mongolian headwaters to a massive delta in Russia.

Lynx Vilden

Lynx Vilden

Founder and head instructor of the Living Wild School, Lynx Vilden has traveled, explored and researched the nature and traditional cultures of arctic, mountain and desert regions from Hudson Bay to the Red Sea. She emerged from her first sweat lodge ceremony in 1989 with the realization of the calling back to the Earth, learning, sharing and teaching the old ways. She has been practicing and teaching primitive living skills both in the U.S. and in Europe since 1991. As an instructor at Boulder Outdoor Survival School in Utah, she taught workshops at primitive skills gatherings, including Rabbitstick and Winter Count. She contributes regularly to the American publication Bulletin of Primitive Technology. Vilden has lived in a Sami village in Scandinavia and lived and studied in the desert Southwest of Arizona and New Mexico, the Rocky Mountains of Montana and the North Cascades of Washington. In 2001, she started the Four Seasons Prehistoric Projects program dedicated to sharing the ancient skills of primitive living. The 2012 film Living Wild, directed by Eric Valli (Caravan, Mountainfilm 2000; Honey Hunters of Nepal, 1991 and Chasseurs Des Tenebres, 1993) documents Vilden and a small group of apprentices living in a prehistoric manner for several months, preparation for her goal of forming a group prepared to live a Stone Age living experiment for a full year.

Jamie Williams

Jamie Williams

Recognized for his outstanding work with the Land Trust Alliance, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Nature Conservancy, Jamie Williams was named president of the Wilderness Society in 2012. Before coming to The Wilderness Society, he served as director of landscape conservation for North America at the Nature Conservancy, where he led the organization’s effort to protect large landscapes and helped develop the large landscape focus within the Obama administration’s America’s Great Outdoors Initiative. A strong believer in collaboration and community-based approaches to conservation, Williams is a founder of both the Montana Association of Land Trusts and the Heart of the Rockies Initiative, and he has served on the board of the Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts and as co-chair of the Yampa River System Legacy Project.

Steve Winter

Steve Winter

Growing up in rural Indiana, Steve Winter always dreamed of becoming a National Geographic photographer. Specializing in wildlife photography, Winter manifested that goal when he became a photojournalist for the publication in 1991, and since then he has won numerous awards, including BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Picture of the Year International’s Global Vision Award. He lectures globally on photography and conservation, and his book, Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Cat,was published by National Geographic in 2013.

Peter Yarrow

Peter Yarrow

Folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Yarrow — part of the 1960s folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary — has been on the activism frontlines since the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement. The songwriter behind such famous recordings as “Puff the Magic Dragon” and “Light One Candle” is committed to using his artistic talents for positive change. Apart from his work with Peter, Paul and Mary, he has recorded four solo albums.